Paul BONIFAS (1893-1967): 1930's earthenware bowl with craquelé celadon enamel, numbered & signed

 

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Paul-Ami BONIFAS (1893-1967) : Beautiful and rare earthenware bowl with light celadon crackled enamel. Signed 'BONIFAS' and numbered '765' underneath.

1930's

Height : 10,8 cm - 4 1/4 in
Diameter : 16,2 cm - 6 3/8 in
Width (with handles) : 24,8 cm - 9 3/4 in

Bibliography

Karen McCREADY : Céramique art déco. London. Thames & Hudson. 2006. -192p.
Coll. : Paul Bonifas: céramiste du purisme. Genève. Musée Ariana. 1997. -154p.
Lamberto FABRI : Paul Bonifas, l'inquietudine e il sublime. Faenza. I Quaderni del Circolo degli Artisti. 1994. -181p.
Barbara von ORELLI-MESSERLI : " Paul Ami Bonifas: The Necessity of Unity" in: Journal of Decorative
and Propaganda Arts, 19 (1993) pp.42-53.
Edgar PELICHET : La céramique art-déco. Paris. Bibliothèque des arts. 1988. Voir pp.76, 82 et 121.
Anne LAJOIX : La céramique en France 1925-1947. Paris. Editions sous le vent. 1983. -196p.
Amédée OZENFANT, Edmond BEAUJON : L'art du potier Paul-Ami Bonifas. Editions de la Baconnière. 1961

Paul BONIFAS (1893-1967) Paul-Ami BONIFAS (1893-1967) :
Paul Ami Bonifas was born in Geneva in 1893. After finishing school, he attended the Ecole des Beaux-Arts while working as an apprentice engraver and jeweler in his father’s workshop. His interest in enamel led him to undertake research on glass and ceramics.
In 1914, he opened his own studio in Versoix, near Geneva , active from 1914-1919.
After First World War he went to Paris, where he met Le Corbusier and Amédée Ozenfant and got involved in their Journal The New Spirit. Under the influence of these two Artists Bonifas adopted the "Purisme" theory. Back to Switzerland in 1923 he opened a new studio near Geneva, but located in France (Ferney-Voltaire). Between the two wars he had a various ceramic production, among other with molded pieces. He experimented also bronzes. He took part in the Autumn Salons from 1927 et in the Artists Decorators Salons from 1931 in Paris.
After 1945 he moved to the U.S. to teach ceramics in the Fine Arts department at the University of Washington in Seattle. He retired from teaching in 1959 to devote himself to his work until his passing in 1967.
Though an excellent thrower, it was not through the richness and the command of his enamels that he became his fame, but as soon as 1925 through his modern shapes, the architectural approach or the sculptural aspect of his vases, which marked the beginning of the famous black-glazed clays. His career, totally unique, was then totally original among the 20 century ceramists.

Bibliography:
Karen McCREADY : Céramique art déco. London. Thames & Hudson. 2006. -192p.
Coll. : Paul Bonifas: céramiste du purisme. Genève. Musée Ariana. 1997. -154p.
Lamberto FABRI : Paul Bonifas, l'inquietudine e il sublime. Faenza. I Quaderni del Circolo degli Artisti. 1994. -181p.
Barbara von ORELLI-MESSERLI : " Paul Ami Bonifas: The Necessity of Unity" in: Journal of Decorative
and Propaganda Arts, 19 (1993) pp.42-53.
Edgar PELICHET : La céramique art-déco. Paris. Bibliothèque des arts. 1988. Voir pp.76, 82 et 121.
Anne LAJOIX : La céramique en France 1925-1947. Paris. Editions sous le vent. 1983. -196p.
Edmond BEAUJON, Amédée OZENFANT : L'art du potier Paul-Ami Bonifas. Editions de la Baconnière. 1961

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