Serge FOTINSKY (1887-1971): 1930's feminine nude, water-color and color pencil, signed

 

 Contact us about this item

Abram Saulovitch AÏZENCHER aka Serge FOTINSKY (1887-1971): Nude thinking woman seated between two masks in a neo-classic decor. Water-color, pencil and color pencil on cream paper. Signed on the bottom right with the ink seal of the Lucien SCHELER (1902-1999) Collection. Newly framed under glass with silver lacquered wood frame.

1930

Drawing: 21 x 13,5 cm - 8 1/4 x 5 5/16 in
Frame: 35 x 28 cm - 13 3/4 x 11 in

History

Provenience: Collection Lucien SCHELER (1902-1999), friend of Serge FOTINSKY and legatee of his widow Julia FOTINSKY.

Bibliography

BENEZIT: Dictionnaire des peintres, sculpteurs, dessinateurs et graveurs. Paris. Gründ. 1999. Vol., page s.n. Fotinsky

Serge FOTINSKY (1887-1971) Abram Saulovitch AÏZENCHER aka Serge FOTINSKY (1887-1971):
Serge Fotinsky, who was skilled as a painter, watercolorist, illustrator, and printmaker, was born in Odessa, Russia in 1887. He studied at the Odessa Art School and in 1903 he left Odessa for St. Petersburg, where he enrolled in the Academy of Fine Arts.
While still a student, Fotinsky took part in the Revolution of 1905. In 1907, prosecuted for his revolutionary activities, he was forced to immigrate. He traveled first to Berlin and then Munich, where he worked for a time at the Fine Arts Academy. In 1908 he arrived in Paris, where he lived and worked for the rest of his life.
Fotinsky exhibited at the Salon des Artistes Independants from 1912 to 1965 and at the Salon d’Automne beginning in 1920. In 1926, 1927, and 1928 he had personal exhibitions at Galerie Billiet-Vorms in Paris. He also took part in collective exhibitions in Limoges, Bordeaux, Reims, Grenoble, Périgueux, and elsewhere.
In 1920 he became the Secretary of the Union of Russian Artists in France. In 1926, his work was shown in Dresden and he participated in numerous collective exhibitions of Russian art around the globe, including London, Vienna, Moscow, Warsaw, Prague and Budapest. In 1928 together with M. F. Larionov he helped to organize the Exhibition of the Modern French Art in Moscow, himself taking part in its Russian section.
In 1920-30s he published his woodcuts in the French editions "Clarté" and "Le Monde". Wood engravings by Fotinsky were used as illustrations for George Duhamel’s Ballades in 1926, and his prints were reproduced in a number of magazines. As a painter, he was encouraged by André Derain who found merit in his work and praised him in print. Fotinsky was allied with the French painters, between the two world wars, known as The School of Paris, and his work of 1920-30s shows the influence of the cubist and fauvist movements (particularly that of Cézanne).
In 1933 he became a member of the Association of revolutionary writers and artists headed by R. Rolland.
In 1935 Fotinsky came to Moscow. Having received a Soviet passport, he stayed there until 1937 and then returned to France.
In 1941 after the German invasion, he was arrested and sent to concentration camp in Campiegne where he was kept for a few years.
In 1945 we meet him again in Paris as an exponent of the exhibition of contemporary expatriate Russian painters and sculptors. In 1946 he had a personal exhibition at the Parisian gallery "de l'Elysée".
In their 'Modern Figurative Paintings', Martin Wolpert and Jeffrey Winter write that 'Fotinsky represents the soul of the École de Paris', he brought the passion of the East and expressed it with the freedom of 20th century Paris.

Source:
E. Bénézit, Dictionnaire Critique et Documentaire des Peintres, Sculpteurs, Dessinateurs et Graveurs, Gründ, Paris, 1999.

 Learn more about Serge FOTINSKY (1887-1971)

<< Back to category

Search

Focus